Tag Archives: Bamboola

Bamboo on the Internet for October – my picks

ArtImage
Photo credit: WoodTV.com

This stunning sculpture kicks off the October bamboo on the Internet list. It’s made from bamboo and string. More photos at the artists Facebook page.

Personal

Bamboo gets very personal with these products:

Furniture (or art?)

This beautiful bamboo chair is named flow. It was created at Scope design studio in Taiwan. I’m glad I don’t have to clean it though. Follow the link to see the more practical set of nesting stools, (not made from bamboo) and more.

Mac accessories

Photo credit: Grovemade.com

Photo credit: Grovemade.com

I’m almost tempted to ditch Android for Mac just to make use of the range of bamboo accessories available. Two came to my attention this month: a roll-top iPad cover and a wonderfully minimalist docking station for an iPhone. These would go well with Bamboola’s bamboo iPhone cover.

Art installation

Wang Wen-Chih’s “The Light of Shodoshima"

Wang Wen-Chih’s “The Light of Shodoshima”

If you’re lucky enough to get to the Woodford Folk Festival this year, you’ll be able to enter the amphitheatre through a 300 metre woven bamboo tunnel. The tunnel is this years special project. In collaboration with Cave Urban, it will be created by Taiwanese sculptor Wang Wen–Chih and team of volunteers. See more of Wang Wen-Chih’s work here. His installation, The Light of Shodoshima, pictured, is one of the many outdoor installations for this years Setouchi Triennale.

Sustainable outdoor cooking fuel

Bamboo charcoal for your barbecue? A start-up in the US is nearly ready to tap into the more than 80 percent of US households that own a barbecue grill. Hot Bambu is one of many Kickstarter projects. Have a look at the table below to see why you should be using bamboo charcoal.

COMPARE THE COALS

HOT Bambú
Lump Charcoal
Wood Lump
Charcoal
Briquette
Charcoal
Contains 100% natural bamboo charcoal
Sustainable grilling from a rapidly renewable resource
Does not contribute to deforestation
Processed in a respectful and environmentally friendly way
Burns clean with little smoke
Contains trees cut from primary forest, plywood, pine (soft wood), and treated flooring scraps
Contributes to illegal logging and green house gas emissions
Creates mass soil erosion and devastation of natural habitat
x Contains ignite coal and sulfur, sodium nitrate (gun powder), limestone, starch, borax (fertilizer), charred sawdust, and toxic solvents that are confirmed to cause kidney and brain damage
x Gives food the taste of fossil fuel

Taiwan → bamboo → Bamboola

At Zhushan bus station

At Zhushan bus station

On a trip to Taiwan earlier this year, I was keen to get to Zhushan to visit bamboo craftsman Liu Wen-Huang and his Bamboola workshop. Like other parts of Taiwan we visited, from the time we arrived in Zhushan, kind and friendly local folk went out of their way to assist us. And we needed a bit help. Arriving at the bus station, we found that the Information Centre had closed down and we no idea how to find Mr Liu. A departing bus was delayed while an English-speaking woman helped us contact the workshop. No one seemed to mind.

tea trays

Tea trays

Mr Liu’s wife collected us from the bus station and drove us to the workshop. On arrival we were offered green tea and invited to open the puzzle boxes. We failed.

The showroom is full of beautifully finished items of original design. Although travelling light, some purchases could not be resisted. Among other things, my travelling companion purchased a set of tea trays and I took home a tea canister. The lid fits with precision and gives an excellent seal to keep tea fresh.

We were just about to be rushed off to the bus station to get the last bus of the day to Xitou, when Mr Liu himself arrived and instantly offered to drive us to the accommodation his staff had kindly arranged for us in Xitou. This gave us time for a factory tour.

Inside the Bamboola showroom

Inside the Bamboola showroom

The factory is high tech. Ideas are developed using specialised computer programs and the laminated bamboo sheets (currently manufactured in China with moso bamboo) are cut with precision by computerised cutting machines. Mr Liu demonstrated the computer programming he uses with a current special project of 5 km of curved book shelves for the National Taiwan University library. Awesome.

Mr Liu then drove us through some very steep back roads to the Ginko hotel in Xitou. The 40 minute trip was very scenic. We passed many moso bamboo groves growing on the steep slopes. Upon arrival we took refreshments with Mr Liu, his wife, and their friend the hotel manager before they left to drive back to Zhushan. Our stay in Xitou warrants a bamboo story in its own right. For another post.

You can read more about Mr Liu and Bamboola here.